How to Use Walter Murch's Eye Trace to "Direct the Eye" with Cinematic Editing #filmeditingtechnique

How to Use Walter Murch's Eye Trace to "Direct the Eye" with Cinematic Editing #filmeditingtechnique

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In today’s video, we’re going to break down one of the most important directing techniques for any type of filmmaker, and then show you how Steven Spielberg used it all throughout the Oscar-winning film, Schindler’s List.

The great Walter Murch has dubbed this advanced directing technique, Eye trace.
Eye trace is a fancy term for directing the eyes of the viewer to certain portions of your frame through the use of a few different helpful methods.

Motion

Positioning

Color

Film directors need to guide the viewer to look at certain things at the correct moment, because part of telling a compelling story is taking everyone on the same ride at the same time so that we can all feel that shared experience.

Spielberg uses eye trace in each of his films, and he applies this masterfully in Schindler’s List. The film won 7 Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Director, and a big part of that was Spielberg’s use of eye trace.

He also kept the film grounded, and avoided the use of technocranes. This thoughtful visual approach reinforces the theme of the film and guides the viewer through the story.

When you finish this video, you will see how a great director like Steven Spielberg keeps his audience on the same page, directs your eyes to where they need to be, and how he uses visuals to support the subject matter and theme of his greatest film, Schindler’s List.

The end result: You will know some helpful methods for applying the most important cinematic technique for directors and editors.

#bestdirectingtipsandtechniques #besteditingtipsandtechniques #spielbergdirecting

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