Photography Tips – Macro Photography – Extreme Close-up for Beginners 📷 DIY in 5 Ep 42

Photography Tips – Macro Photography – Extreme Close-up for Beginners 📷 DIY in 5 Ep 42

Macro Photography is extreme close-up photography, usually of very small subjects, in which the size of the subject in the photograph is greater than life size. To get this type of shot, it’s important to choose the right macro lens and/or extension tubes.
The focal length of macro lenses ranges from 50 to 200mm. Many zoom lenses boast a macro setting but these are usually less than half life-size magnification. A 50 to 60mm lens is suitable for general macro work but with a 100mm lens it would have a greater subject to lens distance. When it comes to cost, 150 to 200mm range is the most expensive. Another option is to add extension tubes. These tubes fit between the rear mount of the lens and the camera body to make the lens focus closer which increases magnification. The more extension, the closer you are able to focus and the more you increase image size. Single tubes can cost around $25 and a set of 3 for around $50.

Another thing to try is using a small aperture. Make your aperture smaller to overcome the shallow depth of field. F11/F16/F22 gives you great depth of field. Also, be sure to use longer or slower shutter speeds.

Especially when shooting macro photography, it’s important to manually focus your shot. In manual mode, you have full control over the exposure setting. To shoot in manual first turn the focus ring until everything is out of focus then turn it the opposite direction until the area you want appears sharp and clear.
Shadows are the worst nightmare to macro photography. Using a flash will allow you to shoot at a reasonable speed, yet enable you to keep the aperture on a high f/11 for sufficient depth of field. Ring flashes can cost around $40 for the lower end models. An easy alternative is to use a reflector.

Finally, exercise your patience. To try and get that one perfect macro shot may require 1000 missed shots. Take your time and the shot will come. Macro photography changes the way you look at the world. It allows you to capture moments that would normally be lost to the human eye.

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